Sunken Garden Poetry Festival Features Jeffrey Harrison, July 23

Sunken Gardens2As part of its July 23 events, the Sunken Garden Poetry Festival presents featured poet Jeffrey Harrison along with Ted Lardner. In addition, the Hartford Steel Symphony will perform between Lardner’s reading and Harrison’s.

Sunken Gardens are on the grounds of the Hill-Stead Museum in Farmington, CT.

Jeffrey Harrison’s most recent book, Into Daylight, is the fastest-selling new book in Tupelo Press’ history. Harrison is the author of five full-length books of poetry. Ted Lardner won the 2013 Sunken Garden Poetry Prize for his chapbook manuscript, We Practice for It.
[Read more...]

Meet Our July Massachusetts Poet in the Spotlight: Melanie Braverman

spotlightMassachusetts Poet in the Spotlight is a monthly installment from Mass Poetry. Each month we shine the spotlight on a poet affiliated with, and nominated by, one of our poetry partners.

 

MelanieBravermanMelanie Braverman is the author of the novel East Justice (Permanent Press, 1996) and the poetry collection Red (Perugia Press, 2002), winner of the Publishers Triangle Audre Lorde Poetry Award. A recipient of grants in both poetry and fiction from the Massachusetts Cultural Council, her work has appeared in the New York Times Sunday Magazine, Poetry, American Poetry Review, and can be seen most recently on Cape Cod’s mass transit buses in collaboration with painter James Broussard, curated by Broadsided Press. [Read more...]

News: New T Poems, New U35 Reading

July poems up on the T

Poetry on the TFour weeks of fresh poems went up on the red line yesterday! We had a great time reading the poem nominations that came in from our $50+ donors during Indiegogo, and we are proud to bring you “From a Window” by Amy Lowell, “Ode to Chicken” by Kevin Young, and “Seduction” by Adelia Prado, translated by Ellen Doré Watson. If you see them on the T, be sure to snap and share a #PoeTrySelfie! [Read more...]

Jade Sylvan on Poets Who Write Prose

This is the sixth in our series of essays on Poets Who Write Prose. First we featured Richard Hoffman.  Then we featured J.D. Scrimgeour who told us about writing the  musical “Only Human.”  Michelle Gillett wrote on being a newspaper columnist. Lauren Wolk wrote on being a novelist. And David Giannini wrote on poets who write prosepoems.

On Memoir

Jade Sylvan

Jade Sylvan

If you’d asked when I was twenty-five if I thought I’d ever write a memoir, I would have said absolutely not. Memoir, as far as I saw it, was masturbation. Poetry and fiction held real truth. I didn’t see any value at all in this type of navel-gazing. Who would want to read about me[Read more...]

David Giannini: Poets Who Write Prose Poems

This is the fifth in our series of essays on Poets Who Write Prose. First we featured Richard Hoffman.  Last week we featured J.D. Scrimgeour who told us about writing the  musical “Only Human.”  Michelle Gillett wrote on being a newspaper columnist. Lauren Wolk wrote on being a novelist.

On Prosepoetry

David Giannini1.

Prosepoetry (as I spell it) is a sort of Dutch door on a cabin in the woods. The larger, heavier, lower half is prose; the upper shorter half is poetry. One key unlocks both, while a vertical bolt unlocks the poetry that then can swing on its own hinge. One may look in or out upon things, but the same things viewed from the top door take on different significance since the bottom half, if remaining shut, may serve to protect. [Read more...]

Lauren Wolk On Poets Who Write Prose

This is is the fourth in our series of essays on Poets Who Write Prose. First we featured Richard Hoffman.  Last week we featured J.D. Scrimgeour who told us about writing the  musical “Only Human.”  Michelle Gillett wrote on being a newspaper columnist.

Lauren Wolk

Lauren Wolk

If fiction is a fist, poetry is a finger.

When I write a novel, I both clench that fist and am caught in it. A good novel (which is always my goal, if not my result) is a weighty and powerful thing that can leave a lasting impression. It is also a world in which I live as I write it, captivated by my characters and their unfolding lives.

When I write a poem, I both point that finger and follow where it beckons. [Read more...]

We Want to Hear from You about Common Threads

A special message from our Program Director, Laurin Macios:

 Common Threads 142015 will mark the 5-year anniversary of Common Threads, and we see the milestone as not only a means for celebration, but for the re-invigoration of our Common Threads programming. If you signed up to receive Common Threads in past years, we want to hear from you. If you could take a moment to help us improve our programming by filling out this brief survey, we’d be grateful.

We are looking forward to bringing you a great Common Threads publication and program in 2015! Stay tuned for details in the next few months.

Thanks and best,

Laurin's signature

 

 

Laurin Macios
Program Director, Mass Poetry

Mark Schorr’s Review of “Only Human”

Cast of "Only Human"

Cast of “Only Human”

The following is Mark Schorr’s review of the musical “Only Human”  with book by J.D. Scrimgeour and music by Aidan and Guthrie Scrimgeour. See J.D.’s earlier essay “A Poet Writes a Musical.”

Poetic Crossover

Oh, happy pair!

Oh, happy we!

It’s very rare

How we agree.
— Richard Wilbur’s lyrics for
Leonard Bernstein’s music in Candide

At their best, the lyrics of American musical theater form a rare agreement with the music by making a special kind of crossover from idea to poetry to music. [Read more...]

Michelle Gillett: Poets Who Write Prose

This is is the third in our series of essays on Poets Who Write Prose. First we featured Richard Hoffman.  Last week we featured J.D. Scrimgeour who told us about writing the  musical “Only Human.”

Michelle Gillett

Michelle Gillett

A woman standing in the back of the room approached me after my poetry reading at the local community college. She complimented me on my poems then asked, “Have you ever thought about writing a newspaper column?”

I hadn’t, at least not since high school when I was editor of the newspaper and would impose my views on my fellow students about their indifference to issues more important than the football team’s success. I wasn’t sure what about my poems made her think I might succeed as a columnist—were they too prosaic? Too opinionated? Her husband was the editorial page editor of our local newspaper; she suggested I send him something. [Read more...]

Our Newsletter: The Latest News

Save the date for U35: Tuesday, July 22 

 

U35_Logo@ The Marliave in Boston

Featuring:
Andrew K. Peterson
Charlotte Seley
David Bartone

Get the details & check out the Facebook event!

And if you missed our May U35 Reading, or just want to relive it, you can catch the readings of Hannah Larrabee, Heather Hughes, and Mario Alejandro Ariza at youtube.com/masspoetrychannel. [Read more...]

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